3 WAYS TO STAY THE COURSE WHEN INSPIRATION FADES

This time in January is when most people lose momentum and give up on their new year's resolutions. It doesn't have to be this way. Chasing dreams, working towards goals, forming new habits, being intentional, life hacking or whatever language you use to describe the pursuit of the thing you care about...that’s what I want to get into today.

Think about the thing that matters to you, or one of them. Got it? Ok. How does your day look different when that thing isn’t driving you, compared to the days when it’s lighting you up? Do you give up all together? Do you have an attitude and convince yourself it doesn't matter anymore? Are you moody with people around you? Do you feel guilty? distracted? unproductive? Just meditate on it for a moment. I think if we’re all being honest with ourselves, we’d admit that the days we lose momentum never satisfy. How can we condition ourselves to stay in it even when it feels like a futile effort?


1. Curiosity over passion

Following your passion is great advice when you’re feeling passionate, right? But what about the days when the fire dies? Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat Pray Love, talks about this beautifully in Big Magic.

"Curiosity is what keeps you working steadily, while hotter emotions may come and go."


"Passion can seem intimidatingly out of reach at times - a distant tower of flame, accessible only to geniuses and to those who are specially touched by God. But curiosity is a milder, quieter, more welcoming, and more democratic entity. The stakes of curiosity are also far lower than the stakes of passion."


"Following that scavenger hunt of curiosity can lead you to amazing, unexpected places. it may even eventually lead you to your passion - albeit a strange, untraceable pathway of back alleys, underground caves, and secret doors."

If I lose all inspiration in the kitchen, which happens now and again, I’ve found that turning to other food-related interests helps. Travel and dining out always infuse me with creativity and ignite my passion for cooking again. When I hit a wall with my workouts, I ditch my usual routine and try another form of movement I've been curious about. When passion eludes you, don't let it convince you that your goal isn't worthwhile anymore. Just stay curious and follow another interest to wherever it leads. You may just find renewed inspiration along the way.


2. Discipline in motion

Stay in motion, at any speed. Inspiration is attracted to motion. This is where discipline comes into play so rely on it to keep propelling you forward. Be disciplined enough to keep moving with consistency and the inertia you generate will be enough. I think we all know the feeling of a workout after too many days away. It’s awkward, usually pretty weak and just feels awful at first. All it usually takes, though, is that one action to recalibrate you. Next, you’ll want to eat a healthier meal to support your workout. Then you'll feel ready for a good night's sleep and turn in early so you can wake up to do another workout. It's an organic process. Take one action. Then take another, but whatever you do, don’t stop all together.


3. Go small

Don’t adopt an all or nothing attitude. Some days, your will power and resolve will be less robust. The 'go big or go home' mentality may ignite some, but most people don't operate with such a fatalistic mentality. Honor your small wins to stay inspired and be realistic about your daily to do's. If missing another 90 minute vinyasa class leaves you feeling defeated, dial back. Tomorrow, aim for a 20 minute flow when the timing works better. Focus on what you can do, celebrate it when you make it happen, and then do a little bit better tomorrow.


I hope this message lands with you as we've approached the tough time of the new year when we are called to dig deeper. As you continue to pursue those things that matter to you, allow me to support you. Please don't hesitate to email me or shoot me a message on instagram @kristenmariasrd. I would love to connect.

Xo, Kristen

©2017 by Kristen Marias, RDN/LDN